Shameful But True: Me, One Year After

When one doesn’t blog for so long, it would seem nothing has happened. Au contraire, too much has. An update is not only fitting but required.

I’m actually planning to move house, and I have been moving bit by bit, that is. This blog, I mean. I bought a domain that I decided would deal with my technological life, and I would just transfer this whole thing in there manually. No other way but that.

Surprisingly, my web dev education has been coming along fairly well. Well, I sort of stopped studying Javascript in the middle of it due to some, ahem, personal issues, but I plan to pick it up as soon as I’m, err, able. So yes, my non-blogging is due to being busy, which is a good problem, isn’t it?

“Hello, It’s Me” – My E.Life after Post 1

(Oh, here’s that Post #1, by the way, to jog your memory.)

Oddly, my reason for writing after such a long gap is prompted by a bad note. Literally (sigh). For that to make sense, you have to read that part in my Post #1 about how someone’s crappy comment on my work became the impetus to my re-entering the IT world and learning anew. However, let me start with the bad part just to get it over with.

I ended up doing the same thing to someone (sigh). Was I happy about it, of course not.  There’s a part of me that loves to depict me as the sort of person who   just doesn’t care, but heck, I admit now  it’s not always true.  I do realize now that there are moments when I do speak my mind – and it’s to those who I feel can do more and be more than who they were at the time, but are stuck. That’s because I also went through and still go through insecure and unconfident times when I question my abilities, and wished someone would care enough to kick my behind when I do that.

Amusingly, though, today, I also realized an amazing thing. If you know you can do something because it’s already inherent in you, why then would I need to say, ‘Ah, I don’t think I can do it and I give up?’ Pretty logical eh. So I guess it could mean a few things. One, maybe I’m just lazy. Meep. Two, I’m being impeded by outside forces beyond my control. But that’s subject to contention, though. If it’s inherent in me, I probably can control it in some way.

Anyway, then, what’s the good part?

The web 2.0 I aimed for? I got there. In fact, I’m already  on Web 3.0 and progressing. I started from zero, and now, I not only know HTML5 and CSS3, I’m studying Jquery. One of my goals is to get into Ruby in the near future. I used to helplessly just watch programmers, drooling, and shrugging enviously – and now I discover than I can actually code like one. Sure, I have a long way to go.

But thank you, Nameless Disagreeable Dude, I shall never cease to thank you for your good taste (haha) and rejecting my ugly work. One of these days, I know I can surpass the website you deemed acceptable, but more than that, I know I will be working not only because of envy, but this time, for the sake of genuinely loving it.

Stuck x Block (+ E-bservations) = goodPost

Observation #1. I find it funny how my blog name ends up being associated with masonry, e.g., freemasonry, of which my theme is anything but. I don’t mind, though, if my e-words get all bound up by e-mortar (snigger).

Observation #2: I find it awesome as well that there is a JS grid layout library called Masonry. Cool. Would be nice to try and use that sometime in the future, as namesake.

This is actually meant to be a placeholder post of sorts – it makes me flip my lip whenever I see how much time has trickled by without me updating at least a bit. The truth is this (takes deep breath). After some months of feverish data gobbling and key tackling, I found myself, well, stuck. Everyone’s favorite work word.

In the old days, the ‘stuck’ thing used to terrify me. I thought I was unique in my suckiness. Not until my net reach got wider and learned to my relief that I’m not alone. It’s the kind of ‘stuck’ any creative or techie goes through every now and then when things just don’t work out the way you want them to.

So, as is my wont to be appreciative of those who value hard work and generosity, I appreciate those who write articles that address these issues, and do so in a real-world-setting way.

My Rebuttal To “Why Learning To Code Is So Darn Hard” – {by Jose Kemp}

How To Survive The Desert of Despair in Your Code-Learning Journey – {by Roberto Rocha}

I noticed that what they say about setting goals is indeed true, and I discovered that it was my problem as well, but that it wasn’t insurmountable (nor unusual). I got so caught up wanting to learn everything at once, so it’s a swift kick-in-the-posterior for me to start streamlining my vision, so to speak.

After all, no one who’s an expert today started out that way. They all began as newbies, too. It’s a path we all take. They say there’s a huge need for people in IT now and in the near future. Here’s hoping by then to be at least one of them.

Being Open To Change Rocks, Too.

The best kind of attitude, in my opinion, for those who work in technology is being open to change. If you quizzically thought “that’s common sense,” I thought so, too. That is, until I jumped into the developers’ world and observed that it isn’t so sometimes, so it seems. Being faced with this stark reality is a good thing for me, though. It gives balance to my otherwise utopian view that all IT personages skip and hop together all the time.

At the end of the day, I realized maybe the best way to go about it would depend on your own perspective. Your individuality may work for you. If I, for example, choose to develop a more adventurous outlook, with an eye open to new things and a brain receptive to change, then I think I’d learn more progressively and quickly. Rather than being nitpicky and jealous over others’ work, I’d ask and see “how did you do that.” I’m thinking maybe if I do that, I’d open more doors to opportunities and gain more friends.

Positivity, after all, is also good for my physical health. So yeah, I guess I’ll just do that. Here’s wishing everyone a good day today, by the way. Hope your code validates. Tech version of “live long and prosper”? Haha.

Helping Each Other and Giving Back Rocks.

There was once a time when every little thing on a website needed to be done manually. All programmers did was teach you how to start HTML (CSS was a bonus) and it’s “You’re on your own, kid.” Nowadays, all one has to do is google-search and there’s a solution for even the tiniest element or function.

Not only do you HTML5 (yes, I’m using that as a verb), you can also SASS or LESS the CSS (still using them as verbs). Not only can you self-layout, you can sometimes grab a boilerplate to act as a complete guide. Even a simple button link can be instantly generated by a good number of sites that offer such service.

I stopped coding right now just to write this post and toss a bit of a “thank you” to the programming community with a heart to give back to us aspirants. In the future, when we are much more able, we promise to give back the same way you did.

Strange Things Do Happen

Been just mucking around (flipping my lip) for the past couple of months since I decided (see 1st post) to do some serious study. #confessiontime. Something strange happened, though. Give take 2-3 weeks ago, I found a coding course which I never expected to finish at all.

I ended up, not only finishing it in record time – a week, I think – but the knowledge base got me started on my own other projects. New or old needing upgrading. Wha. What happened to me.

Although I wrote this post for documentation purposes, deep down, I want to remember how it got to me emotionally as well (sniff#sob). I think I’m getting past the funk I was in earlier and am grateful.

Puzzled: Why Would “Web Design Be Dead?”

Web design: dead or not? Frankly, the very act of raising such an issue is baffling to me. After all, to design is to gather, organize and fix things so as not to make a mess. The idea of not needing design then would be almost like saying, “Whee, I don’t have to coordinate my clothes anymore. Just throw on whatever.” Or worse, “Whee, we don’t need clothes anymore.”

As much as I want to comment, I shall, however, hold my tongue for now. My intent is simply to post the links for your perusal. First, the original article from uxmag.com and second, the response to that post from Smashing Magazine. What do you think?

Why Web Design Is Dead [UX Mag] : by 

“Web Design is Dead.” No, It Isn’t. [Smashing Magazine] : by Vitaly Friedman, 7.8.15

It’s not wise to shut down Google Plus.

Don’t you find it annoying, creating a free email address, only to find out the site has gone down after a month and will not come back ever? Same thing. Even if not permanency, then at least some consistency and reliability is expected of a reputable company such as Google.

Just because it doesn’t “sell” as much as you expect it to – all because you’ve only got eyes on your competitor – that doesn’t mean you just junk it. Doesn’t make sense. You keep eyeing Facebook users and ignoring the Google+ eager audience staring at you in the face (raises a bored hand, which is now down). What’s wrong with you Google people (squint). // End rant.

The Journey To Linux: Elementary, My Dear Watson.

Should I do a jig, now I’ve finally installed Elementary OS as my Linux? (After I’ve sacrificed my entire drive even, since I forgot to backup). The journey, truth told, is a rocky one. It’s been 3 days, I think, since I had it up and running and so far, no major snags. Only culture shock, as I find myself a wee sort of missing some of the old comfortable Windows apps. Gasp.

However! Cough. However, the more I ‘slid’ (like, dude, literally, smooth sailing) into daily usage, the more I’m enamoured with this thing in general. For a time, lotsa users’ experience articles out there moving from Grand Ole Windows to Linux, and I perused kinda many. The straw that broke my back (gurgle), was Windows 7’s constant FREEZING. It paused and shivered every second like an old man with arthritis it wasn’t funny anymore. It got me thinking, that wasn’t supposed to happen, right? I mean, every upgrade should improve. Duh. Billions of dollars over all those years and all we users get is still a clunky hunka junk. So yes, sorry, I felt betrayed in a way.

I guess that’s the sad part, though. How I ended up crawling grudgingly to Linux, when the attitude should be, how to appreciate open source and the sense of community. I should have done so in the first place. Then again, I’d like to think it’s not too late. Linux is forgiving. Haha. Anyway, let’s forget the awfully turbulent past and look forward to sliding into the future.

Continue reading “The Journey To Linux: Elementary, My Dear Watson.”